The virtual nuclear laboratory

Nick Karancevic, Rizwan-Uddin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

In a world where people are overwhelmed by visual information, from television and billboard ads to computer video games, it should come as no surprise that industries are increasingly relying on advanced visualization technology to better handle the increased flow of information. Advanced visualization tools are also being used to improve human-machine interface by providing much more realistic simulated environments for design, training, planning and "practice" purposes. For nuclear engineers, technology to simulate everything from simple half-life measurement experiments to complete control rooms, is readily available and can be used on platforms as accessible as personal computers - or as sophisticated as three-dimensional virtual reality systems. Presented herein is what to an outside observer might look like a typical computer video game, yet to a nuclear engineer it would more closely resemble a simulated nuclear environment, such as a radiation lab, or a control room of a research reactor. It is hoped that modeling tools developed in this project will help large-scale exploitation of virtual reality technology by nuclear engineers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Nuclear Society 4th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface Technology
Pages1367-1376
Number of pages10
StatePublished - 2004
EventAmerican Nuclear Society 4th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface Technology - Columbus, OH, United States

Other

OtherAmerican Nuclear Society 4th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface Technology
CountryUnited States
CityColumbus, OH
Period9/19/049/22/04

Fingerprint

Engineers
Virtual reality
Visualization
Research reactors
Television
Personal computers
Radiation
Planning
Industry
Experiments

Keywords

  • Simulations
  • Virtual reality
  • Visualization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Karancevic, N., & Rizwan-Uddin (2004). The virtual nuclear laboratory. In American Nuclear Society 4th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface Technology (pp. 1367-1376)

The virtual nuclear laboratory. / Karancevic, Nick; Rizwan-Uddin.

American Nuclear Society 4th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface Technology. 2004. p. 1367-1376.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Karancevic, N & Rizwan-Uddin 2004, The virtual nuclear laboratory. in American Nuclear Society 4th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface Technology. pp. 1367-1376, American Nuclear Society 4th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface Technology, Columbus, OH, United States, 19-22 September.
Karancevic N, Rizwan-Uddin. The virtual nuclear laboratory. In American Nuclear Society 4th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface Technology. 2004. p. 1367-1376.

Karancevic, Nick; Rizwan-Uddin / The virtual nuclear laboratory.

American Nuclear Society 4th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Plant Instrumentation, Control and Human Machine Interface Technology. 2004. p. 1367-1376.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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