The use of single cell gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry to identify antimutagens from commercial soybean by-products

Michael J. Plewa, Elizabeth D. Wagner, Lynn Kirchoff, Karen Repetny, Lori C. Adams, A. Lane Rayburn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Single cell gel electrophoresis (alkaline Comet assay) and flow cytometric methods were combined into an assay that enables the analysis of direct DNA damage and longer-term whole cell clastogenicity in mammalian cells. We employed these techniques to analyze the antimutagenic activity of by-products of commercial soybean processing. At a concentration of 1 mg/ml, the soybean molasses by-product was found to repress 66% of the mutagenic capacity of the direct-acting mutagen 2-acetoxyacetylaminofluorene (2AAAF) in Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cells. At a concentration of 50 μg/ml, fraction PCC (an ethanol extract of soybean molasses) repressed 70% of the genotoxic potency of 500 nM 2AAAF as measured by the Comet assay. Fraction PCC was also effective in protecting CHL cells from 2AAAF-induced clastogenic damage. Using a forward mutation assay in Chinese hamster ovary cells (line AS52), PCC protected the cells against 2AAAF-induced cytotoxicity and point mutation at a specific gene target. These data indicate that agronomic crops such as soybean may yield a wealth of commercially available antimutagenic agents that may be suitable as chemoprotective food supplements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-218
Number of pages8
JournalMutation Research - Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis
Volume402
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 18 1998

Keywords

  • 2- acetoxyacetylaminofluorene
  • A nticarcinogenesis
  • Agriculture
  • Anticarcinogen
  • Chemoprotection
  • Chinese hamster lung cell
  • Chinese hamster ovary cell
  • Comet assay
  • Crops

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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