The unique relationship between fear of cognitive dyscontrol and self-reports of problematic drinking

Nancy S. Koven, Wendy Heller, Gregory A. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research has established positive associations between anxiety sensitivity (AS) and problematic drinking in clinical samples. The present study confirmed this relationship in a nonclinical sample (N=162) and investigated which AS dimension best predicts self-reports of problematic drinking. Only one AS facet, fear of cognitive dyscontrol (FCC), was associated with symptoms of alcohol dependence, severity of drinking problems, and alcohol-related expectations of global, positive changes, sexual enhancement, and tension reduction. The possible role of depression in these relationships was also evaluated. A series of hierarchical regressions revealed that, when trait anxiety, anxious arousal, and anxious apprehension were statistically removed, depression did not contribute significant variance beyond the effects of FMC and other anxiety measures. Results suggest that FCC is uniquely associated with self-reports of problematic drinking behaviors and attitudes. Implications for tension-reduction models of alcohol are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-499
Number of pages11
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

Keywords

  • Alcohol drinking attitudes
  • Alcohol drinking patterns
  • Anxiety
  • Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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