The study of cerebral hemodynamic and neuronal response to visual stimulation using simultaneous NIR optical tomography and BOLD fMRI in humans

Xiaofeng Zhang, Vladislav Y. Toronov, Monica Fabiani, Gabriele Gratton, Andrew G. Webb

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

The integration of near-infrared (NIR) and functional MRI (fMRI) studies is potentially a powerful method to investigate the physiological mechanism of human cerebral activity. However, current NIR methodologies do not provide adequate accuracy of localization and are not fully integrated with MRI in the sense of mutual enhancement of the two imaging modalities. Results are presented to address these issues by developing an MRI-compatible optical probe and using diffuse optical tomography for optical image reconstruction. We have developed a complete methodology that seamlessly integrates NIR tomography with fMRI data acquisition. In this paper, we apply this methodology to determine both hemodynamic and early neuronal responses in the visual cortex in humans. Early results indicate that the changes in deoxyhemoglobin concentration from optical data are co-localized with fMRI BOLD signal changes, but changes in oxyhemoglobin concentration (not measurable using fMRI) show small spatial differences.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number115
Pages (from-to)566-572
Number of pages7
JournalProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume5686
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 16 2005
EventPhotonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 22 2005Jan 25 2005

Keywords

  • Diffuse optical tomography
  • FMRI
  • Functional imaging, human brain
  • Near-infrared
  • Neuronal response
  • Visual cortex, hemodynamic response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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