The structure of coordination: transatlantic policy networks and the mobilization of business and civil society

Konstantinos Kourtikakis, Ekaterina Turkina, Evgeny Postnikov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

External policy networks resolve two collective action problems in EU external relations: engaging nonstate actors from the EU and its partner countries in transnational policymaking and converting this engagement to feedback for policymakers. We use formal network analysis to understand the relationship between network structure and collective action by transnational nonstate actors. Our empirical focus is on the Transatlantic Business Council and the Transatlantic Consumer Dialogue networks, which engage business and consumer advocacy organizations in transatlantic economic policymaking. We find that both are highly centralized around EU and US government institutions, with relatively low, but rising, levels of interaction among nonstate organizations. This structure helps increase engagement by giving organizations opportunities to interact with government institutions, learn from their peers, and, for some, to exercise power. It also helps EU and US institutions harness policy feedback, especially from nonstate actors that have frequent interactions with their peers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Common Market Studies
Early online dateNov 24 2020
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - Nov 24 2020

Keywords

  • business
  • civil society
  • collective action
  • policy networks
  • transatlantic relations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Political Science and International Relations

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