The short-term influence of rear wheel axle position and training on manual wheelchair propulsion technique in novice able-bodied participants during steady-state treadmill propulsion, a pilot study

Ian Matthew Rice, Chandrasekaran Jayaraman, Ryan T. Pohlig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To examine if wheelchair fit influenced the effectiveness of video-based propulsion technique training. Method: Based on a cross sectional design, able-bodied participants (n = 21) received an optimally configured wheelchair (OCW; n = 11) or a nonoptimally configured wheelchair (NOCW; n = 10) to determine if propulsion technique was influenced by configuration before and after training. Outcome variables collected during steady-state treadmill propulsion at 1.1 m/s included peak resultant force (peak Fr; N), peak torque (N), contact angle (CA; degrees), stroke frequency (SF; strokes/s), power output (PO; W), and braking torque (BT; N m). Results: Significant group by time interactions were observed for PO (p = 0.05) and peak torque (p = 0.01), while CA, SF, and BT were significant by time (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Results suggest similar benefits from training regardless of rear axle position except for PO and peak torque where configuration was influential. Results suggest the combined effects of optimal configuration with training were most effective; however, those receiving training in a nonoptimal configuration can still improve. Although findings are preliminary, clinicians and end users should be alert to the interplay of configuration andtraining when attempting to modify technique.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)136-143
Number of pages8
JournalAssistive Technology
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 3 2020

Keywords

  • ergonomics
  • feedback
  • rehabilitation
  • wheelchairs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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