The secret life of comics: Socializing and seriality

Carol L. Tilley, Sara Bahnmaier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Dr. Carol Tilley delivered a vision session to the 32nd annual meeting of NASIG in Indianapolis, Indiana, on the history of comics readership and libraries, particularly in the United States during the mid-20th century, and the relevance of comics to libraries in the present. It raised awareness for the audience about progress that has been made on comics collecting and programming, as well as the need for librarians to continue and heighten their enthusiasm for this work. It also reminded us that comics tell stories and communicate ideas. They are part of our cultural heritage and they have been for decades. In questions and answers, the audience discussed both the challenges and the rewards of acquiring and organizing comics at their own institutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-64
Number of pages11
JournalSerials Librarian
Volume74
Issue number1-4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 31 2018

Fingerprint

readership
cultural heritage
reward
librarian
programming
present
history

Keywords

  • Censorship
  • Comics
  • Comics librarianship
  • History of comics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

The secret life of comics : Socializing and seriality. / Tilley, Carol L.; Bahnmaier, Sara.

In: Serials Librarian, Vol. 74, No. 1-4, 31.05.2018, p. 54-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tilley, Carol L. ; Bahnmaier, Sara. / The secret life of comics : Socializing and seriality. In: Serials Librarian. 2018 ; Vol. 74, No. 1-4. pp. 54-64.
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