The role of the family in psychosocial adaptation to physical disabilities for African Americans.

W. L. Turner, R. J. Alston

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The psychosocial adjustment of patients who are experiencing physical disabilities is examined within the context of a family ecological approach. Historical and sociocultural characteristics of African-American families are delineated and explored in terms of their potentially positive impact on the adjustment process. Four family strengths are delineated: strong kinship bonds, strong religious orientation, family role flexibility, and strong education/work ethic. The authors demonstrate how these various assets interact reciprocally in the family lives of those individuals who are disabled. Contrary to the predominant deficit theories, a fresh asset-oriented approach is provided. A model of the family adjustment process of African-American clients with disabilities is presented, and some of the important strengths of the African-American family system are examined. Finally, a family strengths model is applied to the therapeutic process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)915-921
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume86
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1994
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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