The role of sex and drug use during adolescence in determining the risk for adverse consequences of amphetamines

Lauren K. Carrica, Joshua M. Gulley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Use of amphetamines during adolescence, a critical period of brain development and reorganization, may lead to particularly adverse outcomes that are long-lasting. Similarly, female users may be uniquely vulnerable to certain aspects of drug use. A recognition of the role of use during adolescence and sex on outcomes of amphetamine and methamphetamine exposure are of critical importance in understanding and treating substance use disorders. This chapter highlights what human research, which has been largely epidemiological, suggests about sex and age differences in drug use patterns and outcomes. We also discuss work in laboratory animals that has typically utilized rats or mice exposed to drugs in a non-contingent manner (i.e., involuntarily) or through volitional self-administration. Lastly, we draw attention to the fact that advancing our understanding of the effects of amphetamine and methamphetamine use, the development of problematic drug taking, and the mechanisms that contribute to relapse will require an emphasis on inclusion of age and sex as moderating factors in future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Pharmacology
PublisherAcademic Press Inc.
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Publication series

NameAdvances in Pharmacology
ISSN (Print)1054-3589
ISSN (Electronic)1557-8925

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Amphetamine
  • Drug use
  • Methamphetamine
  • Sex differences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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