The role of modality in virtual manipulative design

Seungoh Paek, John Black, Daniel Lew Hoffman, Charles Kinzer, Antonios Saravanos

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The current study examines aspects of multimedia design in virtual learning environments. It compares touch and mouse input methods in conjunction with audio and visual feedback in an effort to improve young children's math learning. Fifty-nine (N=59) second grade students played Puzzle Blocks (PBs), a virtual manipulative designed to introduce students to the concept of multiplication through repetitive addition. All participants showed significant learning outcomes after playing PBs for five sessions. The results show that having auditory feedback is a more influential factor than input method. Implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCHI EA 2011 - 29th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Conference Proceedings and Extended Abstracts
Pages1747-1752
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 8 2011
Event29th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2011 - Vancouver, BC, Canada
Duration: May 7 2011May 12 2011

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Other

Other29th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2011
CountryCanada
CityVancouver, BC
Period5/7/115/12/11

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Keywords

  • Children
  • Design principles
  • Multimedia learning environments
  • Virtual manipulatives

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Software

Cite this

Paek, S., Black, J., Hoffman, D. L., Kinzer, C., & Saravanos, A. (2011). The role of modality in virtual manipulative design. In CHI EA 2011 - 29th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Conference Proceedings and Extended Abstracts (pp. 1747-1752). (Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1145/1979742.1979839