The role of current and emerging technologies in meeting Japan's mid- to long-term carbon reduction goals

Anshuman Chaube, Andrew Chapman, Akari Minami, James Stubbins, Kathryn D. Huff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Using Japan as a proxy for a developed nation, we investigated the role of existing and nascent technologies in curbing carbon emissions. We simulated possible pathways to meeting 2030 and 2050 emission targets within the Japanese electricity supply sector using a single-region model in The Integrated MARKAL-EFOM System (TIMES). Critically, our simulations incorporate novel technologies like hydrogen electrolysers, carbon capture, photochemical water splitting, and emerging photovoltaic cells, assess long-term impacts up to the year 2100, and include life-cycle emissions and learning curves for parameters such as investment cost, efficiency, and emission coefficients. Results indicate that a hybrid approach, using nuclear power and hydrogen from renewable energy-based electrolysis, is cost-effective and provides long-term emission reduction along with energy security. Nuclear, wind, solar, and hydrogen from renewables emerge as key emission reduction technologies, while natural gas with carbon capture plays a minor role in achieving emission reduction targets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number117669
JournalApplied Energy
Volume304
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2021

Keywords

  • Carbon capture
  • Energy model
  • Hydrogen fuel cell
  • Japan
  • Nuclear power

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Building and Construction
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Energy(all)
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

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