The rhetoric and reality of school reform

Choice, competition, and organizational incentives in market-oriented education

Christopher Lubienski, P. S. Myers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

School choice is not a new feature of education in the United States. Yet, since the late 1980s, school choice as education reform policy has helped reshape the administration and character of how educational services are delivered. School choice existed in the postwar era, prior to these changes, with parents of means being able to decide where and with whom their children went to school by way of neighborhood choice. Today, across most states, there is still some mechanism by which parents of varying means can select among different models of schooling. According to the Evergreen Education Group (2014), a digital learning advocacy organization, more than 300,000 students were schooled solely online during the 2013-2014 school year. That organization also reported that during the 2014-2015 academic year, 30 states were expected to have various forms of K-12 schools that operate fully online. The National Center for Education Statistics (2012) estimated that more than 1.7 million students were homeschooled in 2011. Though the online and homeschooled populations represent only a modest number of students, they illustrate the present and increasing options for parents to decide what schooling should look like for their children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEducation Policy Perils
Subtitle of host publicationTackling Tough Issues
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages7-26
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9781317483694
ISBN (Print)9781138898189
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

school choice
school reform
rhetoric
parents
incentive
market
school
education statistics
group education
education
student
learning organization
reform policy
organization
present

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Lubienski, C., & Myers, P. S. (2016). The rhetoric and reality of school reform: Choice, competition, and organizational incentives in market-oriented education. In Education Policy Perils: Tackling Tough Issues (pp. 7-26). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315708713

The rhetoric and reality of school reform : Choice, competition, and organizational incentives in market-oriented education. / Lubienski, Christopher; Myers, P. S.

Education Policy Perils: Tackling Tough Issues. Taylor and Francis, 2016. p. 7-26.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Lubienski, C & Myers, PS 2016, The rhetoric and reality of school reform: Choice, competition, and organizational incentives in market-oriented education. in Education Policy Perils: Tackling Tough Issues. Taylor and Francis, pp. 7-26. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315708713
Lubienski C, Myers PS. The rhetoric and reality of school reform: Choice, competition, and organizational incentives in market-oriented education. In Education Policy Perils: Tackling Tough Issues. Taylor and Francis. 2016. p. 7-26 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315708713
Lubienski, Christopher ; Myers, P. S. / The rhetoric and reality of school reform : Choice, competition, and organizational incentives in market-oriented education. Education Policy Perils: Tackling Tough Issues. Taylor and Francis, 2016. pp. 7-26
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