The persistence of content knowledge

Ralph H. Cullen, Marita A. O'Brien, Wendy A. Rogers, Arthur D. Fisk

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Research has shown that changes in the way a website works or how it is laid out affects how well people are able to use that website. This study examined how changes in the content and procedures of a website-like system affect the way people recover from not being able to find information in that system. Participants were placed in one of four learning conditions, differing by the content and procedures taught for a simple website-like system. They were then tasked with finding certain pages in that system or systems with different procedures, content, or both. The first test (System B Online Test) showed that participants who had to learn new content were less efficient at finding that content, while participants who had to learn new content and procedures were the only ones slowed down. The second test (System C Online Test) showed that participants who had experienced a previous change in content responded to the new change faster, whereas people who started with inconsistent procedures (as compared to consistent) made fewer errors towards the end.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages955-959
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9781615676231
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Event53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009 - San Antonio, TX, United States
Duration: Oct 19 2009Oct 23 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Antonio, TX
Period10/19/0910/23/09

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The persistence of content knowledge'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Cullen, R. H., O'Brien, M. A., Rogers, W. A., & Fisk, A. D. (2009). The persistence of content knowledge. In 53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009 (pp. 955-959). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2). Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1518/107118109x12524442638948