The job of representation in congress: Public expectations and representative approval

J. Tobin Grant, Thomas J. Rudolph

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Few concepts are more central to democratic theory than that of representation. Theories of representation are commonly premised on the belief that citizens' expectations of their representative are politically consequential, yet we know little about the nature of these expectations and precisely how they matter. Using individual-level data from a recent national survey, we investigate the influence of constituents' job expectations on their approval of their representative in Congress. We find that citizens' job expectations condition the effects of members' legislative activities on their job approval.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)431-445
Number of pages15
JournalLegislative Studies Quarterly
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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