The intersection of justice and urban greening: Future directions and opportunities for research and practice

Kate Derickson, Rebecca Walker, Maike Hamann, Pippin Anderson, Olumuyiwa Bayode Adegun, Adriana Castillo-Castillo, Anne Guerry, Bonnie Keeler, Liz Llewellyn, Austin Matheney, Nontsikelelo Mogosetsi-Gabriel, Seema Mundoli, Sumetee Pahwa Gajjar, Nadia Sitas, Linjun Xie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The global uptake of green infrastructure in urban settings holds considerable promise for fostering both social and ecological benefits. Recognizing the imperative to ensure equitable distribution of these advantages, this paper draws on the rich traditions of justice considerations within urban studies to inform research on urban greening. Focusing on three key trends - reconceptualizing the 'urban' category, acknowledging the role of historical processes in shaping contemporary uneven and unjust geographies, and considering power dynamics in infrastructure development - we propose five tenets for advancing justice-focused urban greening research. These tenets encourage researchers to act as knowledge brokers, practice reflexivity, recognise the complex dimensions of justice which diversity of scale might reveal, embrace uncertainty, and cultivate a “modest imaginary” concerning infrastructure projects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number128279
JournalUrban Forestry and Urban Greening
Volume95
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2024

Keywords

  • Equity
  • Green infrastructure
  • Urbanization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Forestry
  • Ecology
  • Soil Science

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