The interpretation of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours by persons with multiple sclerosis

Dominique Kinnett-Hopkins, Yvonne Learmonth, Elizabeth Hubbard, Lara Pilutti, Sarah Roberts, Jason Fanning, Thomas Wójcicki, Edward McAuley, Robert Motl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This study adopted a qualitative research design with directed content analysis and examined the interpretations of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviour by persons with multiple sclerosis. Methods: Fifty three persons with multiple sclerosis who were enrolled in an exercise trial took part in semi-structured interviews regarding personal interpretations of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours. Results: Forty three percent of participants indicated a consistent understanding of physical activity, 42% of participants indicated a consistent understanding of exercise, and 83% of participants indicated a consistent understanding of sedentary behaviour with the standard definitions. There was evidence of definitional ambiguity (i.e., 57, 58, and 11% of the sample for physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviour, respectively); 6% of the sample inconsistently defined sedentary behaviour with standard definitions. Some participants described physical activity in a manner that more closely aligned with exercise and confused sedentary behaviour with exercise or sleeping/napping. Conclusions: Results highlight the need to provide and utilise consistent definitions for accurate understanding, proper evaluation and communication of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours among persons with multiple sclerosis. Practice implications: The application of consistent definitions may minimise ambiguity, alleviate the equivocality of findings in the literature, and translate into improved communication about these behaviours in multiple sclerosis.Implications for Rehabilitation The symptoms of multiple sclerosis can be managed through participation in physical activity and exercise. Persons with multiple sclerosis are not engaging in sufficient levels of physical activity and exercise for health benefits. Rehabilitation professionals should use established definitions of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours when communicating about these behaviours among persons with multiple sclerosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-171
Number of pages6
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 16 2019

Fingerprint

Multiple Sclerosis
Exercise
Rehabilitation
Qualitative Research
Insurance Benefits
Research Design
Interviews

Keywords

  • Multiple sclerosis
  • exercise
  • physical activity
  • sedentary behaviour

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Kinnett-Hopkins, D., Learmonth, Y., Hubbard, E., Pilutti, L., Roberts, S., Fanning, J., ... Motl, R. (2019). The interpretation of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours by persons with multiple sclerosis. Disability and Rehabilitation, 41(2), 166-171. https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2017.1383519

The interpretation of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours by persons with multiple sclerosis. / Kinnett-Hopkins, Dominique; Learmonth, Yvonne; Hubbard, Elizabeth; Pilutti, Lara; Roberts, Sarah; Fanning, Jason; Wójcicki, Thomas; McAuley, Edward; Motl, Robert.

In: Disability and Rehabilitation, Vol. 41, No. 2, 16.01.2019, p. 166-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kinnett-Hopkins, D, Learmonth, Y, Hubbard, E, Pilutti, L, Roberts, S, Fanning, J, Wójcicki, T, McAuley, E & Motl, R 2019, 'The interpretation of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours by persons with multiple sclerosis', Disability and Rehabilitation, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 166-171. https://doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2017.1383519
Kinnett-Hopkins, Dominique ; Learmonth, Yvonne ; Hubbard, Elizabeth ; Pilutti, Lara ; Roberts, Sarah ; Fanning, Jason ; Wójcicki, Thomas ; McAuley, Edward ; Motl, Robert. / The interpretation of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours by persons with multiple sclerosis. In: Disability and Rehabilitation. 2019 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 166-171.
@article{74b3c3241df24d6fa633f7fead2a7a99,
title = "The interpretation of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours by persons with multiple sclerosis",
abstract = "Objectives: This study adopted a qualitative research design with directed content analysis and examined the interpretations of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviour by persons with multiple sclerosis. Methods: Fifty three persons with multiple sclerosis who were enrolled in an exercise trial took part in semi-structured interviews regarding personal interpretations of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours. Results: Forty three percent of participants indicated a consistent understanding of physical activity, 42{\%} of participants indicated a consistent understanding of exercise, and 83{\%} of participants indicated a consistent understanding of sedentary behaviour with the standard definitions. There was evidence of definitional ambiguity (i.e., 57, 58, and 11{\%} of the sample for physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviour, respectively); 6{\%} of the sample inconsistently defined sedentary behaviour with standard definitions. Some participants described physical activity in a manner that more closely aligned with exercise and confused sedentary behaviour with exercise or sleeping/napping. Conclusions: Results highlight the need to provide and utilise consistent definitions for accurate understanding, proper evaluation and communication of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours among persons with multiple sclerosis. Practice implications: The application of consistent definitions may minimise ambiguity, alleviate the equivocality of findings in the literature, and translate into improved communication about these behaviours in multiple sclerosis.Implications for Rehabilitation The symptoms of multiple sclerosis can be managed through participation in physical activity and exercise. Persons with multiple sclerosis are not engaging in sufficient levels of physical activity and exercise for health benefits. Rehabilitation professionals should use established definitions of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours when communicating about these behaviours among persons with multiple sclerosis.",
keywords = "Multiple sclerosis, exercise, physical activity, sedentary behaviour",
author = "Dominique Kinnett-Hopkins and Yvonne Learmonth and Elizabeth Hubbard and Lara Pilutti and Sarah Roberts and Jason Fanning and Thomas W{\'o}jcicki and Edward McAuley and Robert Motl",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1080/09638288.2017.1383519",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "166--171",
journal = "Disability and Rehabilitation",
issn = "0963-8288",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The interpretation of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours by persons with multiple sclerosis

AU - Kinnett-Hopkins, Dominique

AU - Learmonth, Yvonne

AU - Hubbard, Elizabeth

AU - Pilutti, Lara

AU - Roberts, Sarah

AU - Fanning, Jason

AU - Wójcicki, Thomas

AU - McAuley, Edward

AU - Motl, Robert

PY - 2019/1/16

Y1 - 2019/1/16

N2 - Objectives: This study adopted a qualitative research design with directed content analysis and examined the interpretations of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviour by persons with multiple sclerosis. Methods: Fifty three persons with multiple sclerosis who were enrolled in an exercise trial took part in semi-structured interviews regarding personal interpretations of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours. Results: Forty three percent of participants indicated a consistent understanding of physical activity, 42% of participants indicated a consistent understanding of exercise, and 83% of participants indicated a consistent understanding of sedentary behaviour with the standard definitions. There was evidence of definitional ambiguity (i.e., 57, 58, and 11% of the sample for physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviour, respectively); 6% of the sample inconsistently defined sedentary behaviour with standard definitions. Some participants described physical activity in a manner that more closely aligned with exercise and confused sedentary behaviour with exercise or sleeping/napping. Conclusions: Results highlight the need to provide and utilise consistent definitions for accurate understanding, proper evaluation and communication of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours among persons with multiple sclerosis. Practice implications: The application of consistent definitions may minimise ambiguity, alleviate the equivocality of findings in the literature, and translate into improved communication about these behaviours in multiple sclerosis.Implications for Rehabilitation The symptoms of multiple sclerosis can be managed through participation in physical activity and exercise. Persons with multiple sclerosis are not engaging in sufficient levels of physical activity and exercise for health benefits. Rehabilitation professionals should use established definitions of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours when communicating about these behaviours among persons with multiple sclerosis.

AB - Objectives: This study adopted a qualitative research design with directed content analysis and examined the interpretations of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviour by persons with multiple sclerosis. Methods: Fifty three persons with multiple sclerosis who were enrolled in an exercise trial took part in semi-structured interviews regarding personal interpretations of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours. Results: Forty three percent of participants indicated a consistent understanding of physical activity, 42% of participants indicated a consistent understanding of exercise, and 83% of participants indicated a consistent understanding of sedentary behaviour with the standard definitions. There was evidence of definitional ambiguity (i.e., 57, 58, and 11% of the sample for physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviour, respectively); 6% of the sample inconsistently defined sedentary behaviour with standard definitions. Some participants described physical activity in a manner that more closely aligned with exercise and confused sedentary behaviour with exercise or sleeping/napping. Conclusions: Results highlight the need to provide and utilise consistent definitions for accurate understanding, proper evaluation and communication of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours among persons with multiple sclerosis. Practice implications: The application of consistent definitions may minimise ambiguity, alleviate the equivocality of findings in the literature, and translate into improved communication about these behaviours in multiple sclerosis.Implications for Rehabilitation The symptoms of multiple sclerosis can be managed through participation in physical activity and exercise. Persons with multiple sclerosis are not engaging in sufficient levels of physical activity and exercise for health benefits. Rehabilitation professionals should use established definitions of physical activity, exercise, and sedentary behaviours when communicating about these behaviours among persons with multiple sclerosis.

KW - Multiple sclerosis

KW - exercise

KW - physical activity

KW - sedentary behaviour

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85033368216&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85033368216&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/09638288.2017.1383519

DO - 10.1080/09638288.2017.1383519

M3 - Article

C2 - 29111839

AN - SCOPUS:85033368216

VL - 41

SP - 166

EP - 171

JO - Disability and Rehabilitation

JF - Disability and Rehabilitation

SN - 0963-8288

IS - 2

ER -