The interactive effects of labor-led political mobilization and vote propensity on turnout: Evidence from five elections

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The concept of unions as political mobilization groups is not well documented relative to the general determinants of voting behavior and labor's traditional political roles. Specifically, scholars have yet to study the interaction between individuals' propensities to vote and labor-led mobilization. Does labor have a stronger influence on frequent, occasional, or non-voters? Using data totaling 188,551 individuals in Los Angeles over five elections, this paper empirically studies the interaction between vote propensity and mobilization, finding that occasional voters are generally most receptive to labor's efforts, particularly amongst Latinos, and that personal visits and phone calls are successful for occasional voters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)616-639
Number of pages24
JournalIndustrial Relations
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial relations
  • Strategy and Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The interactive effects of labor-led political mobilization and vote propensity on turnout: Evidence from five elections'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this