The influence of exercise intensity on frontal electroencephalographic asymmetry and self-reported affect

Minjung Woo, Sungwoon Kim, Jingu Kim, Steven J Petruzzello, Bradley D. Hatfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The “feel better” effect of exercise has been well established, but the optimal intensity needed to elicit a positive affective response is controversial. In addition, the mechanisms underlying such a response are unclear. To clarify these issues, female undergraduate students were monitored for electroencephalographic (EEG) and self-reported affective responses during the recovery period following rest, low, moderate, and high intensities of treadmill running, each lasting 30 min. Frontal EEG asymmetry and self-reported vigor scores following exercise at all three intensities were significantly elevated compared to those observed following rest. The results suggest that steady-state aerobic exercise bouts executed at varying intensities induce a similar affective response during the recovery period when assessed at both the behavioral and psychophysiological levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-359
Number of pages11
JournalResearch Quarterly for Exercise and Sport
Volume81
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Brain
  • Emotion
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Nephrology

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