The (In)compatibility of Peace and Justice? the International Criminal Court and Civil Conflict Termination

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Does the International Criminal Court's (ICC) pursuit of justice facilitate peace or prolong conflict? This paper addresses the peace versus justice debate by examining the ICC's impact on civil conflict termination. Active ICC involvement in a conflict increases the threat of punishment for rebel and state leaders, which, under certain conditions, generates incentives for these leaders to continue the conflict as a way to avoid capture, transfer to the Hague, and prosecution. The impact of ICC involvement is conditional upon the threat of domestic punishment that leaders face; as the risk of domestic punishment increases, the conflict-prolonging effects of ICC involvement diminish. I test these theoretical expectations on a data set of all civil conflict dyads from 2002 to 2013. Findings support the hypothesized relationship. Even after addressing potential selection and endogeneity concerns, I find that active involvement by the ICC significantly decreases the likelihood of conflict termination when the threat of domestic punishment is relatively low.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-243
Number of pages31
JournalInternational Organization
Volume71
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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International Criminal Court
peace
justice
penalty
threat
leader
court of justice
prosecution
Compatibility
Justice
Termination
Peace
Civil conflict
dyad
Punishment
incentive
Threat

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Law

Cite this

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