The Impact of Instructional Design on College Students' Cognitive Load and Learning Outcomes in a Large Food Science and Human Nutrition Course

Jeanette Andrade, Wen Hao David Huang, Dawn M. Bohn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The effective design of course materials is critical for student learning, especially for large lecture introductory courses. This quantitative study was designed to explore the effect multimedia and content difficulty has on students' cognitive load and learning outcomes. College students (n = 268) were randomized into 1 of 3 multimedia groups: text + graphics (Group 1-TG); audio + text + graphics (Group 2-ATG); or video + audio + text + graphics (Group 3-VATG). Participants answered a demographic survey and pretests before viewing 2 food science supplemental lecture materials (i.e., water mobility and amino acid structures) and completing the cognitive load instrument and post-tests within a noncontrolled setting. Cognitive load scores were tabulated and compared using a 3 × 3 ANOVA and Tukey post hoc analysis across multimedia groups and food science supplemental lecture materials. Based on the post hoc, students in Group 1-TG had higher intrinsic cognitive load scores than Group 2-ATG (ANOVA, P < 0.05). Cognitive load and post-test scores were tabulated and compared using a spearman correlation across groups. In Group 1-TG, students that reported less intrinsic cognitive load had higher post-test scores. Also, students that reported more germane cognitive load had higher post-test scores. In Groups 2-ATG and 3-VATG, students that reported less extraneous cognitive load had higher post-test scores (ANOVA, P < 0.05).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-135
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Food Science Education
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

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Food Technology
human nutrition
college students
food science
nutrition
students
learning
Learning
Students
food
Multimedia
science
Group
analysis of variance
student
Analysis of Variance
testing
multimedia
demographic statistics
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Education

Cite this

The Impact of Instructional Design on College Students' Cognitive Load and Learning Outcomes in a Large Food Science and Human Nutrition Course. / Andrade, Jeanette; Huang, Wen Hao David; Bohn, Dawn M.

In: Journal of Food Science Education, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.10.2015, p. 127-135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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