The impact of accident attention, ideology, and environmentalism on american attitudes toward nuclear energy

John C. Besley, Sanghwa Oh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study involves the analysis of three waves of survey data about nuclear energy using a probability-based online panel of respondents in the United States. Survey waves included an initial baseline survey conducted in early 2010, a follow-up survey conducted in 2010 following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and an additional follow-up conducted just after the 2011 Fukushima, Japan, nuclear accident. The central goal is to assess the degree to which changes in public views following an accident are contingent on individual attention and respondent predispositions. Such results would provide real-world evidence of motivated reasoning. The primary analysis focuses on the impact of Fukushima and how the impact of individual attention to energy issues is moderated by both environmental views and political ideology over time. The analysis uses both mean comparisons and multivariate statistics to test key relationships. Additional variables common in the study of emerging technologies are included in the analysis, including demographics, risk and benefit perceptions, and views about the fairness of decisionmakers in both government and the private sector.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)949-964
Number of pages16
JournalRisk Analysis
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Fairness
  • News
  • Nuclear energy
  • Public opinion
  • Risk communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Physiology (medical)

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