The generation of enlarged eroded pores upon existing intracortical canals is a major contributor to endocortical trabecularization

Christina Møller Andreasen, Lydia Peteva Bakalova, Annemarie Brüel, Ellen Margrethe Hauge, Birgitte Jul Kiil, Jean Marie Delaisse, Mariana Elizabeth Kersh, Jesper Skovhus Thomsen, Thomas Levin Andersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The gradual conversion of cortical bone into trabecular bone on the endocortical surface contributes substantially to thinning of the cortical bone. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the intracortical canals (3D) and pores (2D) in human fibular bone, to identify the intracortical remodeling events leading to this endocortical trabecularization. The analysis was conducted in fibular diaphyseal bone specimens obtained from 20 patients (6 women and 14 men, age range 41–75 years). μCT revealed that endosteal bone had a higher cortical porosity (p < 0.05) and canals with a larger diameter (p < 0.05) than periosteal bone, while the canal spacing and number were similar in the endosteal and periosteal half. Histological analysis showed that the endosteal half versus the periosteal half: (i) had a higher likelihood of being non-quiescent type 2 pores (i.e. remodeling of existing pores) than other pore types (OR = 1.6, p < 0.01); (ii) that the non-quiescent type 2 pores contributed to a higher porosity (p < 0.001); and that (iii) amongst these pores especially eroded type 2 pores contributed to the elevated cortical porosity (p < 0.001). In conclusion, we propose that endocortical trabecularization results from the accumulation of eroded cavities upon existing intracortical canals, favored by delayed initiation of bone formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number115127
JournalBone
Volume130
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020

Fingerprint

Porosity
Bone and Bones
Osteogenesis
Cortical Bone

Keywords

  • Bone formation
  • Bone remodeling
  • Bone resorption
  • Cortical porosity
  • Trabecularization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Histology

Cite this

Andreasen, C. M., Bakalova, L. P., Brüel, A., Hauge, E. M., Kiil, B. J., Delaisse, J. M., ... Andersen, T. L. (2020). The generation of enlarged eroded pores upon existing intracortical canals is a major contributor to endocortical trabecularization. Bone, 130, [115127]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2019.115127

The generation of enlarged eroded pores upon existing intracortical canals is a major contributor to endocortical trabecularization. / Andreasen, Christina Møller; Bakalova, Lydia Peteva; Brüel, Annemarie; Hauge, Ellen Margrethe; Kiil, Birgitte Jul; Delaisse, Jean Marie; Kersh, Mariana Elizabeth; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Andersen, Thomas Levin.

In: Bone, Vol. 130, 115127, 01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Andreasen, CM, Bakalova, LP, Brüel, A, Hauge, EM, Kiil, BJ, Delaisse, JM, Kersh, ME, Thomsen, JS & Andersen, TL 2020, 'The generation of enlarged eroded pores upon existing intracortical canals is a major contributor to endocortical trabecularization', Bone, vol. 130, 115127. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2019.115127
Andreasen, Christina Møller ; Bakalova, Lydia Peteva ; Brüel, Annemarie ; Hauge, Ellen Margrethe ; Kiil, Birgitte Jul ; Delaisse, Jean Marie ; Kersh, Mariana Elizabeth ; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus ; Andersen, Thomas Levin. / The generation of enlarged eroded pores upon existing intracortical canals is a major contributor to endocortical trabecularization. In: Bone. 2020 ; Vol. 130.
@article{633521b53cc940aaa284b2d83ae1a50f,
title = "The generation of enlarged eroded pores upon existing intracortical canals is a major contributor to endocortical trabecularization",
abstract = "The gradual conversion of cortical bone into trabecular bone on the endocortical surface contributes substantially to thinning of the cortical bone. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the intracortical canals (3D) and pores (2D) in human fibular bone, to identify the intracortical remodeling events leading to this endocortical trabecularization. The analysis was conducted in fibular diaphyseal bone specimens obtained from 20 patients (6 women and 14 men, age range 41–75 years). μCT revealed that endosteal bone had a higher cortical porosity (p < 0.05) and canals with a larger diameter (p < 0.05) than periosteal bone, while the canal spacing and number were similar in the endosteal and periosteal half. Histological analysis showed that the endosteal half versus the periosteal half: (i) had a higher likelihood of being non-quiescent type 2 pores (i.e. remodeling of existing pores) than other pore types (OR = 1.6, p < 0.01); (ii) that the non-quiescent type 2 pores contributed to a higher porosity (p < 0.001); and that (iii) amongst these pores especially eroded type 2 pores contributed to the elevated cortical porosity (p < 0.001). In conclusion, we propose that endocortical trabecularization results from the accumulation of eroded cavities upon existing intracortical canals, favored by delayed initiation of bone formation.",
keywords = "Bone formation, Bone remodeling, Bone resorption, Cortical porosity, Trabecularization",
author = "Andreasen, {Christina M{\o}ller} and Bakalova, {Lydia Peteva} and Annemarie Br{\"u}el and Hauge, {Ellen Margrethe} and Kiil, {Birgitte Jul} and Delaisse, {Jean Marie} and Kersh, {Mariana Elizabeth} and Thomsen, {Jesper Skovhus} and Andersen, {Thomas Levin}",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.bone.2019.115127",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "130",
journal = "Bone",
issn = "8756-3282",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The generation of enlarged eroded pores upon existing intracortical canals is a major contributor to endocortical trabecularization

AU - Andreasen, Christina Møller

AU - Bakalova, Lydia Peteva

AU - Brüel, Annemarie

AU - Hauge, Ellen Margrethe

AU - Kiil, Birgitte Jul

AU - Delaisse, Jean Marie

AU - Kersh, Mariana Elizabeth

AU - Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus

AU - Andersen, Thomas Levin

PY - 2020/1

Y1 - 2020/1

N2 - The gradual conversion of cortical bone into trabecular bone on the endocortical surface contributes substantially to thinning of the cortical bone. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the intracortical canals (3D) and pores (2D) in human fibular bone, to identify the intracortical remodeling events leading to this endocortical trabecularization. The analysis was conducted in fibular diaphyseal bone specimens obtained from 20 patients (6 women and 14 men, age range 41–75 years). μCT revealed that endosteal bone had a higher cortical porosity (p < 0.05) and canals with a larger diameter (p < 0.05) than periosteal bone, while the canal spacing and number were similar in the endosteal and periosteal half. Histological analysis showed that the endosteal half versus the periosteal half: (i) had a higher likelihood of being non-quiescent type 2 pores (i.e. remodeling of existing pores) than other pore types (OR = 1.6, p < 0.01); (ii) that the non-quiescent type 2 pores contributed to a higher porosity (p < 0.001); and that (iii) amongst these pores especially eroded type 2 pores contributed to the elevated cortical porosity (p < 0.001). In conclusion, we propose that endocortical trabecularization results from the accumulation of eroded cavities upon existing intracortical canals, favored by delayed initiation of bone formation.

AB - The gradual conversion of cortical bone into trabecular bone on the endocortical surface contributes substantially to thinning of the cortical bone. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the intracortical canals (3D) and pores (2D) in human fibular bone, to identify the intracortical remodeling events leading to this endocortical trabecularization. The analysis was conducted in fibular diaphyseal bone specimens obtained from 20 patients (6 women and 14 men, age range 41–75 years). μCT revealed that endosteal bone had a higher cortical porosity (p < 0.05) and canals with a larger diameter (p < 0.05) than periosteal bone, while the canal spacing and number were similar in the endosteal and periosteal half. Histological analysis showed that the endosteal half versus the periosteal half: (i) had a higher likelihood of being non-quiescent type 2 pores (i.e. remodeling of existing pores) than other pore types (OR = 1.6, p < 0.01); (ii) that the non-quiescent type 2 pores contributed to a higher porosity (p < 0.001); and that (iii) amongst these pores especially eroded type 2 pores contributed to the elevated cortical porosity (p < 0.001). In conclusion, we propose that endocortical trabecularization results from the accumulation of eroded cavities upon existing intracortical canals, favored by delayed initiation of bone formation.

KW - Bone formation

KW - Bone remodeling

KW - Bone resorption

KW - Cortical porosity

KW - Trabecularization

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074581782&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85074581782&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.bone.2019.115127

DO - 10.1016/j.bone.2019.115127

M3 - Article

C2 - 31689525

AN - SCOPUS:85074581782

VL - 130

JO - Bone

JF - Bone

SN - 8756-3282

M1 - 115127

ER -