The exhausted horse syndrome.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Exhaustion occurs in most equestrian sports, but it is more frequent in events that require sustained endurance work such as endurance racing, three-day eventing, trial riding, and hunting. Exhaustion is also more likely when an unfit, unacclimatized, or unsound horse is exercised. Mechanisms that contribute to exhaustion include heat retention, fluid and electrolyte loss, acid-base imbalance, and intramuscular glycogen depletion. Clinical signs include elevated temperature, pulse, and respiratory rate; depression; anorexia; unwillingness to continue to exercise; dehydration; weakness; stiffness; hypovolemic shock; exertional myopathy; synchronous diaphragmatic flutter; atrial fibrillation; diarrhea; colic; and laminitis. Treatment includes stopping exercise; rapid cooling; rapid large volume intravenous or oral fluid administration; and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-219
Number of pages15
JournalThe Veterinary clinics of North America. Equine practice
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Equine

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