The emerging neuroprotective role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 in traumatic brain injury

Kieran P. Normoyle, Miri Kim, Arash Farahvar, Daniel Llano, Kevin Jackson, Huan Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a multifaceted disease with intrinsically complex heterogeneity and remains a significant clinical challenge to manage. TBI model systems have demonstrated many mechanisms that contribute to brain parenchymal cell death, including glutamate and calcium toxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria are critically regulated by uncoupling proteins (UCP), which allow protons to leak back into the matrix and thus reduce the mitochondrial membrane potential by dissipating the proton motive force. This uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis is potentially critical for protection against cellular injury as a result of TBI and stroke. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanism or mechanisms by which uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) functions to maintain or optimize mitochondrial function, and the conditions which precipitate the failure of these mechanisms, would inform future research and treatment strategies. We posit that UCP2-mediated function underlies the physiological response to neuronal stress associated with traumatic and ischemic injury and that clinical development of UCP2-targeted treatment would significantly impact these patient populations. With a focus on clinical relevance in TBI, we synthesize current knowledge concerning UCP2 and its potential neuroprotective role and apply this body of knowledge to current and potential treatment modalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)179-186
Number of pages8
JournalTranslational Neuroscience
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 20 2015

Fingerprint

Proton-Motive Force
Mitochondrial Membrane Potential
Oxidative Phosphorylation
Wounds and Injuries
Protons
Glutamic Acid
Mitochondria
Oxidative Stress
Cell Death
Therapeutics
Adenosine Triphosphate
Stroke
Inflammation
Calcium
Uncoupling Protein 2
Traumatic Brain Injury
Brain
Population
Mitochondrial Uncoupling Proteins

Keywords

  • Ischemia
  • Mitochondria
  • Neuronal cell death
  • Neuronal injury
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The emerging neuroprotective role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 in traumatic brain injury. / Normoyle, Kieran P.; Kim, Miri; Farahvar, Arash; Llano, Daniel; Jackson, Kevin; Wang, Huan.

In: Translational Neuroscience, Vol. 6, No. 1, 20.07.2015, p. 179-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Normoyle, Kieran P. ; Kim, Miri ; Farahvar, Arash ; Llano, Daniel ; Jackson, Kevin ; Wang, Huan. / The emerging neuroprotective role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 in traumatic brain injury. In: Translational Neuroscience. 2015 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 179-186.
@article{2f94851deb3a41a2a25dc4fb5d487624,
title = "The emerging neuroprotective role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 in traumatic brain injury",
abstract = "Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a multifaceted disease with intrinsically complex heterogeneity and remains a significant clinical challenge to manage. TBI model systems have demonstrated many mechanisms that contribute to brain parenchymal cell death, including glutamate and calcium toxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria are critically regulated by uncoupling proteins (UCP), which allow protons to leak back into the matrix and thus reduce the mitochondrial membrane potential by dissipating the proton motive force. This uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis is potentially critical for protection against cellular injury as a result of TBI and stroke. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanism or mechanisms by which uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) functions to maintain or optimize mitochondrial function, and the conditions which precipitate the failure of these mechanisms, would inform future research and treatment strategies. We posit that UCP2-mediated function underlies the physiological response to neuronal stress associated with traumatic and ischemic injury and that clinical development of UCP2-targeted treatment would significantly impact these patient populations. With a focus on clinical relevance in TBI, we synthesize current knowledge concerning UCP2 and its potential neuroprotective role and apply this body of knowledge to current and potential treatment modalities.",
keywords = "Ischemia, Mitochondria, Neuronal cell death, Neuronal injury, Traumatic brain injury",
author = "Normoyle, {Kieran P.} and Miri Kim and Arash Farahvar and Daniel Llano and Kevin Jackson and Huan Wang",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1515/tnsci-2015-0019",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "6",
pages = "179--186",
journal = "Translational Neuroscience",
issn = "2081-3856",
publisher = "de Gruyter",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The emerging neuroprotective role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 in traumatic brain injury

AU - Normoyle, Kieran P.

AU - Kim, Miri

AU - Farahvar, Arash

AU - Llano, Daniel

AU - Jackson, Kevin

AU - Wang, Huan

PY - 2015/7/20

Y1 - 2015/7/20

N2 - Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a multifaceted disease with intrinsically complex heterogeneity and remains a significant clinical challenge to manage. TBI model systems have demonstrated many mechanisms that contribute to brain parenchymal cell death, including glutamate and calcium toxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria are critically regulated by uncoupling proteins (UCP), which allow protons to leak back into the matrix and thus reduce the mitochondrial membrane potential by dissipating the proton motive force. This uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis is potentially critical for protection against cellular injury as a result of TBI and stroke. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanism or mechanisms by which uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) functions to maintain or optimize mitochondrial function, and the conditions which precipitate the failure of these mechanisms, would inform future research and treatment strategies. We posit that UCP2-mediated function underlies the physiological response to neuronal stress associated with traumatic and ischemic injury and that clinical development of UCP2-targeted treatment would significantly impact these patient populations. With a focus on clinical relevance in TBI, we synthesize current knowledge concerning UCP2 and its potential neuroprotective role and apply this body of knowledge to current and potential treatment modalities.

AB - Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a multifaceted disease with intrinsically complex heterogeneity and remains a significant clinical challenge to manage. TBI model systems have demonstrated many mechanisms that contribute to brain parenchymal cell death, including glutamate and calcium toxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondria are critically regulated by uncoupling proteins (UCP), which allow protons to leak back into the matrix and thus reduce the mitochondrial membrane potential by dissipating the proton motive force. This uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation from adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis is potentially critical for protection against cellular injury as a result of TBI and stroke. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanism or mechanisms by which uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) functions to maintain or optimize mitochondrial function, and the conditions which precipitate the failure of these mechanisms, would inform future research and treatment strategies. We posit that UCP2-mediated function underlies the physiological response to neuronal stress associated with traumatic and ischemic injury and that clinical development of UCP2-targeted treatment would significantly impact these patient populations. With a focus on clinical relevance in TBI, we synthesize current knowledge concerning UCP2 and its potential neuroprotective role and apply this body of knowledge to current and potential treatment modalities.

KW - Ischemia

KW - Mitochondria

KW - Neuronal cell death

KW - Neuronal injury

KW - Traumatic brain injury

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84941619350&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84941619350&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1515/tnsci-2015-0019

DO - 10.1515/tnsci-2015-0019

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 179

EP - 186

JO - Translational Neuroscience

JF - Translational Neuroscience

SN - 2081-3856

IS - 1

ER -