The Emergence of Paleobiology

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter provides an historical overview of paleobiology, from the origin of the term itself through the emergence of a distinct set of paleobiological methods and questions in the 1950s and 1960s. It suggests that while paleobiology experienced an accelerated period of activity during the 1970s and 1980s, its roots were firmly established by the work of the previous generation of paleontologists, particularly by George Gaylord Simpson and Norman Newell. This chapter also mentions that it was in the 1980s that paleobiology was established as a mainstay in many university and museum departments.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Paleobiological Revolution
Subtitle of host publicationEssays on the Growth of Modern Paleontology
EditorsDavid Sepkoski, Michael Ruse
PublisherUniversity of Chicago Press
Pages15-42
ISBN (Electronic)9780226748597
ISBN (Print)9780226275710, 9780226748610
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Keywords

  • paleobiology
  • paleontologists
  • George Gaylord Simpson
  • Norman Newell
  • paleobiological methods

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  • Research Output

    The Paleobiological Revolution: Essays on the Growth of Modern Paleontology

    Sepkoski, D. (ed.) & Ruse, M. (ed.), 2009, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 568 p.

    Research output: Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook

  • Cite this

    Sepkoski, D. (2009). The Emergence of Paleobiology. In D. Sepkoski, & M. Ruse (Eds.), The Paleobiological Revolution: Essays on the Growth of Modern Paleontology (pp. 15-42). University of Chicago Press. https://doi.org/10.7208/chicago/9780226748597.003.0002