The efficacy of problem-focused and emotional approach interventions varies as a function of emotional processing style

John P. Baker, Howard Berenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined whether individual differences in emotional processing style (e.g., attention to and clarity of emotions) moderated the effectiveness of emotional approach and problem-focused interventions. Forty-one college freshmen were randomly assigned to one of two adjustment-to-college interventions: (a) an emotional approach intervention in which participants described their feelings, the sources of these feelings, and were provided with feedback about their feelings; or (b) a problem-focused intervention in which participants discussed how to solve their problems. Positive affect, negative affect, and anhedonic depression were measured before the intervention and 2 weeks subsequent to the intervention. Dimensions of emotional processing style were assessed using self-report. Participants low in attention to emotions benefited more from the emotional approach intervention, whereas those high in attention benefited more from the problem-focused intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)66-82
Number of pages17
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Emotion
  • Emotional processing style
  • Problem-focused
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The efficacy of problem-focused and emotional approach interventions varies as a function of emotional processing style'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this