The Effects of the BAILAMOS Dance Program on Hippocampal Volume in Older Latinos: A randomized controlled pilot study

Jacqueline Guzman, Susan Aguinaga, Guilherme M Balbim, Melissa Lamar, Isabela G Marques, David X Marquez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Hippocampal atrophy is associated with cognitive decline. Physical activity (PA) can reverse the hippocampal loss. This study investigated the effects of the 4 month BAILAMOS dance program on hippocampal volume and self-reported PA in Latinos. Participants were randomized to the BAILAMOS dance program or waitlist control group (N = 14, n = 10 intervention, n = 4 waitlist, 67 ± 6.1 years old, 70% female). Hippocampal volumes were derived from Magnetic Resonance Imaging whole-brain T1-weighted images. Participants self-reported PA through the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors Physical Activity Questionnaire for older adults. There were no statistically significant changes in hippocampal volume preintervention to postintervention (F[1, 8] = .077, p = .79, d = .05) and no associations between PA change and hippocampal volume (F[4, 13] = .71, p = .61). However, dance participants self-reported more PA (d = .54) compared to the control. These findings demonstrate that the BAILAMOS dance program did not decrease hippocampal atrophy; however, it increased self-reported PA. Future studies should include longer and more cognitively demanding interventions to determine whether dance can reduce cognitive decline through hippocampal changes.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberibab009
Pages (from-to)1857-1862
Number of pages6
JournalTranslational Behavioral Medicine
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2021

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Dance
  • Latinos
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience
  • Applied Psychology

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