The effects of oral repeated reading with and without corrective feedback on middle school struggling readers

Diana Sukhram, Lisa Ellen Monda-Amaya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study examines the effects of oral repeated reading, with and without corrective feedback, on the fluency and comprehension skills of 60 struggling readers in 7th Grade. Comparisons were made by group on narrative and expository reading ability and by comprehension question type. Students were randomly assigned to one of two reading groups (oral repeated reading with corrective feedback and oral repeated reading without corrective feedback). Participants in each group were required to repeatedly read a narrative and an expository passage. Statistical analyses (namely, repeated measures ANOVA and ANCOVA) were used to determine the overall effects on fluency and comprehension and differential effects demonstrated by groups on text type and comprehension question type. Results indicated that both forms of intervention improved fluency and comprehension. Limitations and implications for research and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-111
Number of pages17
JournalBritish Journal of Special Education
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Keywords

  • fluency
  • repeated reading
  • struggling readers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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