The effects of direct questions on preschool children's responses to indirect requests

Rosa Milagros Santos Gilbertz, Benjamin Lignugaris-Kraft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Indirect instructional approaches, such as responsive interaction, are common in inclusive early childhood settings. Unfortunately, young children with disabilities do not always have the skills to take advantage of these learning opportunities. Teaching children with disabilities to be more responsive to developmentally appropriate indirect instructional strategies may help them take advantage of and benefit from available learning opportunities in inclusive settings. The purpose of this research was to examine the extent to which presenting a series of direct questions increased children's attempts to respond and correct responses to indirect requests. Increased attempts to respond and correct responses to indirect requests were evident for all participants with whom the intervention was implemented. Three of the participants continued to attempt to respond and responded correctly to indirect requests when intervention procedures were removed. The contributions of these findings to literature on language instruction with young children, implications of the findings for practitioners, methodological limitations, and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-210
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Behavioral Education
Volume9
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999

Keywords

  • Attempts to respond
  • Behavior momentum
  • Direct questions
  • Early childhood
  • Indirect requests
  • Instructional momentum
  • Language delays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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