The Effect of Parents and Peers on the Neural Correlates of Risk Taking and Antisocial Behavior During Adolescence

Christy R. Rogers, Virnaliz Jimenez, Amanda Benjamin, Karen D. Rudolph, Eva H. Telzer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Social and neurobiological factors independently associate with the development of antisocial behavior during adolescence, yet it is unclear how these factors contribute to antisocial behavior in girls. Using a longitudinal sample of 45 adolescent girls (age in years at scan: M = 15.38, SD = 0.33), this study examined the contributions of parent-adolescent relationship quality and deviant peer affiliation from 6th–8th grades along with the neural correlates of risk taking in 9th grade to later antisocial behavior. High parent-adolescent closeness in early adolescence predicted lower antisocial behavior for girls in later adolescence via lower affiliation with deviant peer groups and less activation of the medial prefrontal cortex during risk taking. Findings highlight the enduring role of parents and peers during adolescence, and the importance of investigating social relationships alongside the brain to identify a holistic understanding of the development of antisocial behavior in girls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1674-1684
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of youth and adolescence
Volume52
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2023

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Antisocial behavior
  • Parents
  • Peers
  • Risk taking
  • fMRl

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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