The effect of contradictory information on recently acquired knowledge

Anne E. Adams, C. Travis Bowles, Ki C. Choi, Wendy A. Rogers, Arthur D. Fisk

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

When individuals encounter information contradicting their beliefs, they may briefly retain the contradiction, but are likely to revert to their original beliefs over time. Past research has focused on the effects of prior knowledge and consistency of information when prior knowledge was well-established. This study investigated the effects of prior knowledge and information consistency for recently acquired knowledge. By learning whether the same reverting effect holds for recently acquired information, interventions can be sought to enhance recall of important information. Participants in this study were given two information packages about a fictional animal and their recall on various facts tested. Although a large proportion of participants recalled the updated information, overall recall of contradicted information after two weeks was reduced compared to when information was consistent. Recall of the original information was shown to resurface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005
Pages1831-1835
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Externally publishedYes
Event49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Sep 26 2005Sep 30 2005

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period9/26/059/30/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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  • Cite this

    Adams, A. E., Travis Bowles, C., Choi, K. C., Rogers, W. A., & Fisk, A. D. (2005). The effect of contradictory information on recently acquired knowledge. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005 (pp. 1831-1835). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).