The effect of an expressive writing intervention (EWI) on stress in infertile couples undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment: A randomized controlled pilot study

Signe Matthiesen, Hillary Klonoff-Cohen, Robert Zachariae, Mikael B. Jensen-Johansen, Berit K. Nielsen, Yoon Frederiksen, Lone Schmidt, Hans Jakob Ingerslev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives. Infertile couples undergoing fertility treatments may experience stress and could benefit from psychological intervention. Expressive Writing Intervention (EWI) has shown promising results on various psychological outcomes, yet only one study has applied the method to infertility-related stress. Our aim was to assess feasibility and effectiveness of EWI for patients in treatment with Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART). Design and participants. Patients enrolling in their first ART treatment at the fertility clinic, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark were offered to participate. A total of 82 participants (45 women, 37 men), mean age: 33.17, were randomized to home-based EWI or neutral writing control group and completed an infertility-related stress questionnaire at treatment enrollment, 3 weeks later (at the time of down regulation), and 6 weeks after the intervention. The intervention took place 2 weeks after treatment start. Results. Mixed between-within ANOVA showed a main effect of time (Wilks Lambda = 0.68, F(2,28) = 6.48) as well as a significant interaction effect between group (control/ EWI) and time (Wilks Lambda = 0.83, F(2,28) = 2.92). Infertility-related stress decreases were observed after the intervention in the EWI group compared to controls. Six weeks after the intervention, stress tended to increase in both groups, with the control group, follow-up stress levels exceeding baseline stress scores, whereas the follow-up scores of EWI-participants' did not exceed baseline levels. Conclusions. Our preliminary results suggest EWI to be a feasible, cost-effective, and efficient method for alleviating infertility-related stress, although results should be considered preliminary and further testing with a larger sample is warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)362-378
Number of pages17
JournalBritish Journal of Health Psychology
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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