The development of procedural knowledge: An alternative explanation for chronometric trends of mental arithmetic

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Abstract

In a review of the Chronometrie literature, M. H. Ashcraft (Developmental Review, 1982, 2, 213-236) concluded that the development of number fact efficiency is due to a shift from relying on procedural knowledge such as counting to relying on declarative knowledge (a stored network of facts). This model assumes that all procedural processes are slow or remain slow, which is probably not the case. An alternative account posits that the key change in number fact efficiency involves a shift from slow counting procedures to principled procedural knowledge. As rules, heuristics, and principles become more familiar and interconnected, their use, for example, in producing the number facts becomes more automatic. The use of such procedural knowledge would be cognitively more economical than storing individual facts in long-term memory. Finally, existing Chronometric data can readily be interpreted in terms of this alternative model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-230
Number of pages6
JournalDevelopmental Review
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1983
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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