The combustion characteristics of 10-micron aluminum particles at elevated temperature and pressure

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Aluminum particles are often added to solid propellants to increase performance. This work presents experimental evidence that flame structure deviates from the vapor-phase diffusion flame observed in larger particles as the particles size decreases below 20 microns. As this transition occurs, the emission temperature measured via AlO emission spectroscopy, which is close to the peak temperature in the flame, decreases significantly and approaches the particle surface temperature. The reaction zone moves closer to the particle surface. The combustion times of 10 micron particles are found to differ from larger particles. Measurements in different oxidizing environments indicate that combustion time decreases as percent oxidizer increases, with oxygen being the strongest oxidizer followed by CO 2 and H 2O, respectively. The burn time in oxygen decreases dramatically with increasing pressure, while the burn time in water vapor and carbon dioxide increases slightly when pressure increased. At the particle sizes investigated here, there is some evidence that surface processes could be playing an important role in overall rate of aluminum combustion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication41st AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference and Exhibit
StatePublished - 2005
Event41st AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference and Exhibit - Tucson, AZ, United States
Duration: Jul 10 2005Jul 13 2005

Other

Other41st AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference and Exhibit
CountryUnited States
CityTucson, AZ
Period7/10/057/13/05

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Bazyn, T., Glumac, N. G., & Krier, H. (2005). The combustion characteristics of 10-micron aluminum particles at elevated temperature and pressure. In 41st AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference and Exhibit