The association of physical examination abnormalities and carboxyhemoglobin concentrations in 21 dogs trapped in a kennel fire

Elizabeth A. Ashbaugh, Elisa M. Mazzaferro, Brendan C. Mckiernan, Kenneth J. Drobatz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate physical examination findings and their association with carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) concentrations in 21 dogs that were exposed to smoke during a kennel fire. Series Summary: Twenty-one dogs were exposed to a kennel fire. Physical exam findings, presenting, and posttherapy COHb concentrations as well as therapeutic interventions were evaluated. COHb concentrations upon presentation were increased in all smoke inhalation exposed dogs. These dogs were compared to a small set of clinically normal staff-owned dogs who were not exposed to fire. Physical parameters significantly associated with higher COHb concentrations included lower body temperature, increased respiratory effort, abnormal respiratory auscultation, altered neurologic status, and length of hospital stay. Oxygen therapy resulted in a more rapid decline in COHb concentrations although 5 dogs still had mildly increased COHb concentrations 24-hour postadmission. Unique Information Provided: This study describes the relationship of admitting clinical findings of dogs exposed to a kennel fire with their initial blood COHb concentrations. It also describes the resolution of increased COHb concentrations with use of oxygen therapy and hospitalization. Additionally, COHb concentrations for a control group of dogs was evaluated and compared to the dogs exposed to smoke inhalation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-367
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Volume22
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Keywords

  • Carbon monoxide
  • Respiratory distress
  • Smoke inhalation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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