The activation of tissue factor by high intensity focused ultrasound - A pathway to acoustic-biochemical hemostasis

Xinmai Yang, Frank E. Barber, James H. Morrissey, Charles C. Church

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is believed to have great potential for inducing hemostasis in severely bleeding trauma victims. The addition of HIFU-activated biomolecular substances to the blood during treatment could significantly reduce the time required to achieve hemostasis, but such substances must remain inactive everywhere except at the site of injury. The integral-membrane protein, tissue factor (TF), is by far the most potent known trigger for the blood clotting cascade. We propose to employ liposomes with the extracellular domain of TF facing the lumen ("encrypted TF") to allow the TF molecules to be introduced into the blood stream without causing systemic activation of coagulation. HIFU sonication at the site of injury will be used to break up the liposomes and thereby expose TF to the plasma, thus combining the hemostatic potential of HIFU along with an increase in the rate of clot formation triggered by TF. In our initial studies we have produced a range of concentrations of liposomes containing encrypted TF in a buffer solution and exposed them to ultrasound at a number of different intensity levels and duty cycles. Clotting assays were performed to determine the level of the desired effect of the ultrasound. The results suggest that HIFU can be effective in exposing active TF from the encrypted liposomes to accelerate blood clotting at the site of exposure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTHERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND
Subtitle of host publication5th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound
Pages548-552
Number of pages5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 8 2006
EventTHERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND: 5th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 27 2005Oct 29 2005

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume829
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

OtherTHERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND: 5th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/27/0510/29/05

Fingerprint

hemostatics
activation
acoustics
clotting
blood
bleeding
lumens
coagulation
cascades
buffers
actuators
membranes
proteins
cycles

Keywords

  • H1FU
  • Hemostasis
  • Liposomes
  • Tissue factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Yang, X., Barber, F. E., Morrissey, J. H., & Church, C. C. (2006). The activation of tissue factor by high intensity focused ultrasound - A pathway to acoustic-biochemical hemostasis. In THERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND: 5th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound (pp. 548-552). (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 829). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2205534

The activation of tissue factor by high intensity focused ultrasound - A pathway to acoustic-biochemical hemostasis. / Yang, Xinmai; Barber, Frank E.; Morrissey, James H.; Church, Charles C.

THERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND: 5th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound. 2006. p. 548-552 (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 829).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yang, X, Barber, FE, Morrissey, JH & Church, CC 2006, The activation of tissue factor by high intensity focused ultrasound - A pathway to acoustic-biochemical hemostasis. in THERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND: 5th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound. AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 829, pp. 548-552, THERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND: 5th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound, Boston, MA, United States, 10/27/05. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2205534
Yang X, Barber FE, Morrissey JH, Church CC. The activation of tissue factor by high intensity focused ultrasound - A pathway to acoustic-biochemical hemostasis. In THERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND: 5th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound. 2006. p. 548-552. (AIP Conference Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2205534
Yang, Xinmai ; Barber, Frank E. ; Morrissey, James H. ; Church, Charles C. / The activation of tissue factor by high intensity focused ultrasound - A pathway to acoustic-biochemical hemostasis. THERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND: 5th International Symposium on Therapeutic Ultrasound. 2006. pp. 548-552 (AIP Conference Proceedings).
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