The activation of chemicals into mutagens by green plants

Michael Jacob Plewa, J. M. Gentile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The studies discussed and the data presented in this article indicate that plants can activate promutagenic chemicals into mutagens. Also, some chemical mutagens can be deactivated by plant tissues. The data suggest that a class of plant promutagens distinct from mammalian promutagens may exist. The activation of agricultural chemicals into mutagens poses possible risks to the public health, and this problem must be studied further. Plants are excellent in situ monitors for mutagens and promutagens. The life cycles of many species allow their use in chronic assays of the environment for periods of weeks to months. We believe that the use of plant genetic assays will continue to make a contribution to the understanding of the presence and fate of environmental mutagens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-420
Number of pages20
JournalChemical Mutagens
VolumeVol. 7
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982

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Mutagens
Chemical activation
Assays
assay
Agrochemicals
agrochemical
Public health
public health
Life cycle
life cycle
chemical
mutagen
Tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Chemistry(all)

Cite this

Plewa, M. J., & Gentile, J. M. (1982). The activation of chemicals into mutagens by green plants. Chemical Mutagens, Vol. 7, 401-420.

The activation of chemicals into mutagens by green plants. / Plewa, Michael Jacob; Gentile, J. M.

In: Chemical Mutagens, Vol. Vol. 7, 01.01.1982, p. 401-420.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Plewa, MJ & Gentile, JM 1982, 'The activation of chemicals into mutagens by green plants', Chemical Mutagens, vol. Vol. 7, pp. 401-420.
Plewa MJ, Gentile JM. The activation of chemicals into mutagens by green plants. Chemical Mutagens. 1982 Jan 1;Vol. 7:401-420.
Plewa, Michael Jacob ; Gentile, J. M. / The activation of chemicals into mutagens by green plants. In: Chemical Mutagens. 1982 ; Vol. Vol. 7. pp. 401-420.
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