Testing the Selectivity Hypothesis in cause-related marketing among Generation Y: [When] Does gender matter for short- and long-term persuasion?

Alexandra M. Vilela, Michelle R. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cause-related marketing (CRM) can enhance corporate image and increase sales, but effects may vary depending on the audience. Findings from a national survey, Study 1, reveal that Generation Y women are more likely than Generation Y men to support CRM. Our research further demonstrates unique findings with respect to message processing and response to a CRM campaign. In an experimental setting, Study 2 shows different gendered responses to a CRM campaign over time. Results show that men's purchase intentions decrease after message exposure, but increase after a two-week delay; the opposite was true for women. In line with the Selectivity Hypothesis theory, only women integrated multiple cues into the formation of purchase intentions. Theoretical and managerial aspects of gender for CRM are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-35
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Marketing Communications
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2016

Keywords

  • Generation Y
  • Selectivity Hypothesis
  • cause-related marketing
  • gender
  • purchase intention
  • short- versus long-term persuasion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Marketing

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