Teaching veterinary anesthesia and surgery: The impact of instructor availability on anesthesia, operative, and recovery times in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy or castration

Lynetta J. Freeman, David Huse, Rebecca Lee, Tomo Inoue, Ann B. Weil, Peter D. Constable

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Veterinary students learning to perform elective ovariohysterectomy (OVH) and castration procedures have traditionally been taught by a few instructors supervising many student groups simultaneously. This study, using a historical control group, explored the impacts of having a dedicated instructor with each student group for anesthetic induction and an entire surgical procedure. Our hypothesis was that preparation, surgical, and anesthesia times would be shorter and, consequently, post-operative recovery times would be shorter with a dedicated instructor compared to traditional methods. Anesthesia records of dogs undergoing elective surgery by third-year veterinary students were reviewed over 3 consecutive years. Traditional instruction was used in year 1(Y1), and a dedicated instructor per student group was used in year 2 (Y2) and year 3 (Y3). Anesthesia time, surgical time, recovery time, and pre- and post-operative rectal temperature were analyzed, and a stepwise regression model was developed for factors influencing recovery time. Of 206 records reviewed (Y1, 33; Y2, 98; Y3, 75), there were 101 OVH procedures and 105 castration procedures. Preparation, surgery, and anesthesia times were longer in animals undergoing surgery in Y1, when the traditional instruction method was used. Recovery time was not influenced by instructor assignment Using dedicated instructors to teach OVH and castration to third-year veterinary students decreased overall anesthesia time by 36 to 49 minutes for OVH and 29 to 32 minutes for castration. A teaching model of dedicated instructors requires excellent coordination between surgeons and anesthesiologists to ensure that a similar number of animals can undergo procedures in the time allotted for teaching.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)390-399
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Veterinary Medical Education
Volume41
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Keywords

  • Educational methods
  • Instructional methods
  • Surgical teaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • veterinary(all)

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