Teaching Systematic Instruction Competencies to Special Education Student Teachers: An Applied Behavioral Supervision Model

Mark F. O'reilly, Adelle Renzaglia, Meg Hutchins, Laura Koterba-Buss, Mark Clayton, James W. Halle, Cornelia Izen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study compared the effectiveness of immediate and delayed feedback supervision procedures on the acquisition of systematic instruction skills by three pre-service teachers who were receiving practicum experience in classrooms for students with severe disabilities. Behaviors targeted for intervention were: (a) the appropriate use of positive consequences, and (b) the appropriate use of systems of instructional prompts. All supervision procedures were administered by university supervisors. Results indicated that immediate feedback was more effective with two student teachers and delayed feedback was more effective for the third participant. Unobtrusive observations of two participants in the practicum sites following the intervention indicated that the teaching skills maintained in the absence of the university supervisors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-111
Number of pages8
JournalResearch and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1992

Keywords

  • behavioral supervision
  • student teachers
  • systematic instruction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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