Task-evoked pupillary response to mental workload in human-computer interaction

Shamsi T. Iqbal, Xianjun Sam Zheng, Brian P. Bailey

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Accurate assessment of a user's mental workload will be critical for developing systems that manage user attention (interruptions) in the user interface. Empirical evidence suggests that an interruption is much less disruptive when it occurs during a period of lower mental workload. To provide a measure of mental workload for interactive tasks, we investigated the use of task-evoked pupillary response. Results show that a more difficult task demands longer processing time, induces higher subjective ratings of mental workload, and reliably evokes greater pupillary response at salient subtasks. We discuss the findings and their implications for the design of an attention manager.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationExtended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2004
Pages1477-1480
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
EventConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2004 - Vienna, Austria
Duration: Apr 24 2004Apr 29 2004

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings

Other

OtherConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2004
CountryAustria
CityVienna
Period4/24/044/29/04

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Interruption
  • Mental workload
  • Pupil size
  • Task models
  • User studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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