Surviving oppression under the rock: The intersection of new york's drug, welfare, and educational polices in the lived experiences of low-income African Americans

Liliane Cambraia Windsor, Eloise Dunlap, Marilyn Armour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Drawing on standpoint and intersectionality theories, this study explores the degree to which interactions among New York State's Rockefeller Drug Laws and educational and welfare policies have contributed to the maintenance of a culture of surveillance in which the lives of impoverished African Americans are overseen and influenced by oppressive policies and governmental institutions. Qualitative secondary analysis of longitudinal ethnographic data was conducted. Findings demonstrate multiple disadvantages that impoverished African American families struggling with substance use or sale experience. These disadvantages accumulated intergenerationally, in a snowball effect, making it difficult for participants to maintain stable lives. Findings explored the tension between participants' lived experiences and the multiple ways they either assimilated or resisted their oppression. New sensitive policies informed by standpoint, intersectionality, and Afrocentric perspectives must be developed to increase the availability of meaningful employment and strengthening impoverished African American communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)339-361
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • drug use policy
  • oppression
  • poverty
  • welfare

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health(social science)

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