SURVIVAL OF TRANSLOCATED CLUBSHELL AND NORTHERN RIFFLESHELL IN ILLINOIS

Kirk W Stodola, Alison P Stodola, Jeremy S Tiemann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Translocation of freshwater mussels is a conservation tool used to reintroduce extirpated populations or augment small populations. Few studies have evaluated the effectiveness of translocations, mainly because estimating survival is challenging and time-consuming. We used a mark-recapture approach to estimate survival of nearly 4,000 individually marked Clubshell ( Pleurobema clava ) and Northern Riffleshell ( Epioblasma rangiana ) translocated to eight sites over a five-year period into the Salt Fork and Middle Fork Vermilion rivers in central Illinois. Survival differed among sites and between species; Clubshell were approximately five times more likely to survive than Northern Riffleshell. Survival also increased in the fourth year following a release and decreased following high-flow events. Translocating numerous individuals into multiple sites over a period of years could spread the risk of catastrophic high-flow events and maximize the likelihood for establishing self-sustaining populations.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89--102
JournalFreshwater Mollusk Biology and Conservation
Volume20
StatePublished - 2017

Keywords

  • INHS

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