Supporting Situation Assessment through Attention Guidance and Diagnostic Aiding: The Benefits and Costs of Display Enhancement on Judgment Skill

William J. Horrey, Christopher D. Wickens, Richard Strauss, Alex Kirlik, Thomas R. Stewart

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter presents a study of human performers' ability to integrate multiple sources of displayed, uncertain information in a laboratory simulation of threat assessment in a battlefield environment. Two different types of automated aids were used to enhance the situation display, the first guiding visual attention to relevant cues, the second recommending an actual judgment. The chapter also assesses performance in terms of skill score, as well as its decomposition using Stewart's refinement of Murphy's skill score measure using Brunswik's lens model. Results indicate that the introduction of display enhancement in this task has both benefits and costs, in terms of performance. Modeling offers plausible interpretations of these (in some cases counterintuitive) effects. It is noted here that the skill score decomposition augmented with lens model analysis shows results that would not be readily apparent using more traditional measures of performance such as percent correct or reaction time. It is believed that this research provides a useful demonstration of how additional insights into situation assessment and human-automation interaction can be gained by analysis and modeling that simultaneously describes human judgment, the task environment, and their interaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdaptive Perspectives on Human-Technology Interaction
Subtitle of host publicationMethods and Models for Cognitive Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199847693
ISBN (Print)9780195374827
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 22 2012

Fingerprint

Cost-Benefit Analysis
Lenses
Aptitude
Automation
Reaction Time
Cues
Research

Keywords

  • Attention guidance
  • Costs
  • Diagnostic aiding
  • Display enhancement
  • Judgment
  • Lens model
  • Skill score
  • Visual attention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Horrey, W. J., Wickens, C. D., Strauss, R., Kirlik, A., & Stewart, T. R. (2012). Supporting Situation Assessment through Attention Guidance and Diagnostic Aiding: The Benefits and Costs of Display Enhancement on Judgment Skill. In Adaptive Perspectives on Human-Technology Interaction: Methods and Models for Cognitive Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195374827.003.0006

Supporting Situation Assessment through Attention Guidance and Diagnostic Aiding : The Benefits and Costs of Display Enhancement on Judgment Skill. / Horrey, William J.; Wickens, Christopher D.; Strauss, Richard; Kirlik, Alex; Stewart, Thomas R.

Adaptive Perspectives on Human-Technology Interaction: Methods and Models for Cognitive Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction. Oxford University Press, 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Horrey, WJ, Wickens, CD, Strauss, R, Kirlik, A & Stewart, TR 2012, Supporting Situation Assessment through Attention Guidance and Diagnostic Aiding: The Benefits and Costs of Display Enhancement on Judgment Skill. in Adaptive Perspectives on Human-Technology Interaction: Methods and Models for Cognitive Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195374827.003.0006
Horrey WJ, Wickens CD, Strauss R, Kirlik A, Stewart TR. Supporting Situation Assessment through Attention Guidance and Diagnostic Aiding: The Benefits and Costs of Display Enhancement on Judgment Skill. In Adaptive Perspectives on Human-Technology Interaction: Methods and Models for Cognitive Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction. Oxford University Press. 2012 https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195374827.003.0006
Horrey, William J. ; Wickens, Christopher D. ; Strauss, Richard ; Kirlik, Alex ; Stewart, Thomas R. / Supporting Situation Assessment through Attention Guidance and Diagnostic Aiding : The Benefits and Costs of Display Enhancement on Judgment Skill. Adaptive Perspectives on Human-Technology Interaction: Methods and Models for Cognitive Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction. Oxford University Press, 2012.
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