Superplastic Formation of Metal Nanostructure Arrays with Ultrafine Gaps

Yaowu Hu, Yi Xuan, Xiaolei Wang, Biwei Deng, Mojib Saei, Shengyu Jin, Joseph Irudayaraj, Gary J. Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A general strategy that utilizes laser shock to enable ultrafast tuning of ordered metallic nanostructures to change the distance between them and generate precise nanoscale gaps was studied The optomechanical engineering of metal nanogaps was performed with a laser-shock-turning (LST) process. A pulse nanosecond laser was used to irradiate multilayer laminates, including a transparent confinement layer, a sacrificial layer, a momentum transfer layer (MTL), and the target metal nanostructures. Upon laser irradiation, the sacrificial layer (graphite) was instantaneously ionized. The expanding plasma was confined by a transparent confinement layer and induced by an instant shock pressure. The MTL transfers the shock pressure to the metal nanostructures. Under a laser fluence of 17 kJ cm-2, the 160 nm nanoparticle has 75.5% and 37.8% plastic strains in the axial and radial directions, respectively, which are significantly larger than corresponding strains of 38.6% and 19.3 % for the 300 nm nanoparticle. A similar size effect is also observed in other dimensions and under other laser fluencies. Although we observed that ultrafine nanogaps are formed after LST, it is not clear how the nano-line-gaps are formed instead of nano-point-gaps, and if the gaps are formed by 'hit-n-separate' or another unknown mechanism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9152-9162
Number of pages11
JournalAdvanced Materials
Volume28
Issue number41
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Nanostructures
Metals
Lasers
Momentum transfer
Nanoparticles
Plasma confinement
Graphite
Laser beam effects
Laminates
Laser pulses
Plastic deformation
Multilayers
Tuning
Ultrafine
Plasmas

Keywords

  • laser shock
  • nanoantennas
  • nanogaps
  • post-fabrication tuning
  • superplastic
  • surface enhanced Raman scattering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Hu, Y., Xuan, Y., Wang, X., Deng, B., Saei, M., Jin, S., ... Cheng, G. J. (2016). Superplastic Formation of Metal Nanostructure Arrays with Ultrafine Gaps. Advanced Materials, 28(41), 9152-9162. https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201602497

Superplastic Formation of Metal Nanostructure Arrays with Ultrafine Gaps. / Hu, Yaowu; Xuan, Yi; Wang, Xiaolei; Deng, Biwei; Saei, Mojib; Jin, Shengyu; Irudayaraj, Joseph; Cheng, Gary J.

In: Advanced Materials, Vol. 28, No. 41, 01.01.2016, p. 9152-9162.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hu, Y, Xuan, Y, Wang, X, Deng, B, Saei, M, Jin, S, Irudayaraj, J & Cheng, GJ 2016, 'Superplastic Formation of Metal Nanostructure Arrays with Ultrafine Gaps', Advanced Materials, vol. 28, no. 41, pp. 9152-9162. https://doi.org/10.1002/adma.201602497
Hu, Yaowu ; Xuan, Yi ; Wang, Xiaolei ; Deng, Biwei ; Saei, Mojib ; Jin, Shengyu ; Irudayaraj, Joseph ; Cheng, Gary J. / Superplastic Formation of Metal Nanostructure Arrays with Ultrafine Gaps. In: Advanced Materials. 2016 ; Vol. 28, No. 41. pp. 9152-9162.
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