Sugar deprivation reduces insemination of anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae), despite daily recruitment of adults, and predicts decline in model populations

C. M. Stone, R. M. Taylor, B. D. Roitberg, W. A. Foster

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Our research tests the hypothesis that the inability to sugar-feed reduces the insemination rate in mosquito populations. To test this, we measured the effects of sugar availability on cumulative insemination performance of male Anopheles gambiae Giles s. s. (Diptera: Culicidae) during 10-d periods of continual emergence of equal numbers of both sexes, and we evaluated the implications at the population level with a matrix population model. On each day of each of four replicates, 20 newly emerged mosquitoes of each sex were recruited into the populations within two mesocosms, large walk-in enclosures with simulated natural conditions. Each mesocosm contained a cage to replicate the experiment on a small scale. Scented sucrose was absent or present (control). A human host was available nightly as a bloodmeal source in both mesocosms. Sugar availability and enclosure size significantly influenced female insemination. In the mesocosms, with sugar 49.7% of the females were inseminated, compared with 10.9% of the females without sugar. In the small cages, the insemination rates were 76.0 and 23.5%, respectively. In the mesocosms, cumulative survival of females after 10 d was 51.6% with sugar and 25.6% without sugar. In the cages, female survival was 95 and 73%, respectively. Sensitivity analysis of the population projection matrix shows that both reduced male survival and reduced mating capability due to a lack of sugar contributed to lower insemination rates in females, and in the absence of sugar the insemination rate was lowered to an extent that led to population decline.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1327-1337
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of medical entomology
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Mating performance
  • Mosquito
  • Population projection matrix
  • Sugar feeding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • veterinary(all)
  • Insect Science
  • Infectious Diseases

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