Sucrose-phosphate synthase responds differently to source-sink relations and to photosynthetic rates: Lolium perenne L. growing at elevated p(CO2) in the field

H. Isopp, M. Frehner, Stephen P Long, J. Nösberger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lolium perenne, a main component species in managed grassland, is well adapted to defoliation, fertilization, and regrowth cycles; and hence, to changes in the assimilatory carbon source-sink ratio. In the Swiss Free Air CO2 Enrichment experiment the source-sink ratio is (i) increased by elevated partial pressure of CO2 (p(CO2)), (ii) decreased by enhanced carbon use under high N fertilization, and (iii) gradually increased during regrowth after defoliation. Since sucrose synthesis plays a central role in leaf carbohydrate metabolism in this fructan-accumulating species, we investigated how sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) responds to the differing assimilatory carbon fluxes and source-sink ratios in the field. Assimilatory carbon flux, as estimated by leaf gas exchange, strongly depended on p(CO2). Surprisingly, the SPS content per leaf area did not increase with p(CO2), but increased with N fertilization. During later regrowth, when a dense canopy had formed, the SPS content decreased; in particular, SPS was decreased at high N under elevated p(CO2). Further, the higher assimilatory carbon flux through SPS at elevated p(CO2) was accompanied by a higher activation state of SPS. The SPS content correlated very strongly with the ratio of free sucrose to free amino acid in leaves, which represents the carbon source-sink ratio. Hence, SPS content in L. perenne appears to be regulated by the current, strongly nitrogen-dependent, source-sink relation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)597-607
Number of pages11
JournalPlant, Cell and Environment
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

Fingerprint

sucrose-phosphate synthase
source-sink relationships
Lolium
Lolium perenne
carbon dioxide
Carbon Cycle
carbon
Carbon Sequestration
Fertilization
regrowth
defoliation
Sucrose
Fructans
sucrose
leaves
fructans
Partial Pressure
Carbohydrate Metabolism
carbohydrate metabolism
free amino acids

Keywords

  • Amino acid
  • Carbon dioxide enrichment
  • Fructan
  • Lolium perenne
  • Nitrogen fertilization
  • Photosynthesis
  • Protein
  • Source-sink ratio
  • Sucrose
  • Sucrose-phosphate synthase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Sucrose-phosphate synthase responds differently to source-sink relations and to photosynthetic rates : Lolium perenne L. growing at elevated p(CO2) in the field. / Isopp, H.; Frehner, M.; Long, Stephen P; Nösberger, J.

In: Plant, Cell and Environment, Vol. 23, No. 6, 01.01.2000, p. 597-607.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Lolium perenne, a main component species in managed grassland, is well adapted to defoliation, fertilization, and regrowth cycles; and hence, to changes in the assimilatory carbon source-sink ratio. In the Swiss Free Air CO2 Enrichment experiment the source-sink ratio is (i) increased by elevated partial pressure of CO2 (p(CO2)), (ii) decreased by enhanced carbon use under high N fertilization, and (iii) gradually increased during regrowth after defoliation. Since sucrose synthesis plays a central role in leaf carbohydrate metabolism in this fructan-accumulating species, we investigated how sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) responds to the differing assimilatory carbon fluxes and source-sink ratios in the field. Assimilatory carbon flux, as estimated by leaf gas exchange, strongly depended on p(CO2). Surprisingly, the SPS content per leaf area did not increase with p(CO2), but increased with N fertilization. During later regrowth, when a dense canopy had formed, the SPS content decreased; in particular, SPS was decreased at high N under elevated p(CO2). Further, the higher assimilatory carbon flux through SPS at elevated p(CO2) was accompanied by a higher activation state of SPS. The SPS content correlated very strongly with the ratio of free sucrose to free amino acid in leaves, which represents the carbon source-sink ratio. Hence, SPS content in L. perenne appears to be regulated by the current, strongly nitrogen-dependent, source-sink relation.",
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AB - Lolium perenne, a main component species in managed grassland, is well adapted to defoliation, fertilization, and regrowth cycles; and hence, to changes in the assimilatory carbon source-sink ratio. In the Swiss Free Air CO2 Enrichment experiment the source-sink ratio is (i) increased by elevated partial pressure of CO2 (p(CO2)), (ii) decreased by enhanced carbon use under high N fertilization, and (iii) gradually increased during regrowth after defoliation. Since sucrose synthesis plays a central role in leaf carbohydrate metabolism in this fructan-accumulating species, we investigated how sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) responds to the differing assimilatory carbon fluxes and source-sink ratios in the field. Assimilatory carbon flux, as estimated by leaf gas exchange, strongly depended on p(CO2). Surprisingly, the SPS content per leaf area did not increase with p(CO2), but increased with N fertilization. During later regrowth, when a dense canopy had formed, the SPS content decreased; in particular, SPS was decreased at high N under elevated p(CO2). Further, the higher assimilatory carbon flux through SPS at elevated p(CO2) was accompanied by a higher activation state of SPS. The SPS content correlated very strongly with the ratio of free sucrose to free amino acid in leaves, which represents the carbon source-sink ratio. Hence, SPS content in L. perenne appears to be regulated by the current, strongly nitrogen-dependent, source-sink relation.

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