Subsequent births in families of children with disabilities: Using demographic data to examine parents' reproductive patterns

Meghan M. Burke, Richard C. Urbano, Robert M. Hodapp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The authors determined family reproductive patterns after the birth of a child with (vs. without) a disability. Using Tennessee birth records, the authors examined families of children with Down syndrome (N = 1,123), spina bifida (N = 368), and population group (N = 734,189). Families of children with Down syndrome and with spina bifida were more likely to have subsequent children and larger family sizes than the population group. When a 1st-born target child was born, 28.8% of families had a 2nd child in the population group compared with 37.1% and 45.7% when the child had spina bifida or Down syndrome, respectively. Families of children with disabilities were more likely to have subsequent children regardless of maternal race, marital status, and educational level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-245
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican journal on intellectual and developmental disabilities
Volume116
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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