Subacute spinal subdural hematoma after spontaneous resolution of cranial subdural hematoma

Causal relationship or coincidence? Case report

Carlo Bortolotti, Huan Wang, Kennet Fraser, Giuseppe Lanzino

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The etiopathogenesis of traumatic spinal subdural hematoma (SSH) is uncertain. Unlike the supratentorial subdural space, no bridging veins traverse the spinal subdural space. The authors describe a case of subacute SSH that occurred after spontaneous resolution of traumatic intracranial SDH and suggest a causal relationship between the two. A 23-year-old woman suffered an acute intracranial SDH after a snowboarding accident. There was no clinical or radiological evidence of spine injury. Conservative management of the supratentorial SDH resulted in spontaneous radiologically documented resolution with redistribution of blood in the subdural space. Four days after the injury, the patient started noticing new onset of mild low-back pain. The pain progressively worsened. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine 10 days after the original injury revealed a large L4-S2 SDH. Ten days after the original injury, bilateral L5-S1 laminotomy and drainage of the subacute spinal SDH were performed. The patient experienced immediate pain relief. The authors hypothesize that in some cases spinal SDH may be related to redistribution of blood from the supratentorial subdural space.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-374
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume100
Issue number4 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Apr 2004

Fingerprint

Intracranial Subdural Hematoma
Spinal Subdural Hematoma
Subdural Space
Wounds and Injuries
Spine
Skiing
Pain
Laminectomy
Low Back Pain
Accidents
Drainage
Veins
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Keywords

  • Intracranial subdural hematoma
  • Spinal subdural hematoma
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Subacute spinal subdural hematoma after spontaneous resolution of cranial subdural hematoma : Causal relationship or coincidence? Case report. / Bortolotti, Carlo; Wang, Huan; Fraser, Kennet; Lanzino, Giuseppe.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 100, No. 4 SUPPL., 04.2004, p. 372-374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bortolotti, Carlo ; Wang, Huan ; Fraser, Kennet ; Lanzino, Giuseppe. / Subacute spinal subdural hematoma after spontaneous resolution of cranial subdural hematoma : Causal relationship or coincidence? Case report. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 2004 ; Vol. 100, No. 4 SUPPL. pp. 372-374.
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