Study on combustion characteristics and particulate emissions of a common-rail diesel engine fueled with n-butanol and waste cooking oil blends

Limin Geng, Yang Chen, Xubo Chen, Chia fon F. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Biodiesel is a promising alternative fuel because of its renewability and extensive source of raw materials. Butanol can be blended in biodiesel to reduce the kinematic viscosity and promote the fuel atomization. In this respect, biodiesel was blended with 10% and 20% n-butanol, and the combustion characteristics and particulate emissions of the fuel blends were tested in a turbocharged, 6-cylinder, common rail diesel engine at a constant speed of 1400 rpm under seven engine loads. The experimental results show that under various engine loads, all of the butanol and biodiesel fuel blends provide faster combustion than diesel due to the higher oxygen content of n-butanol and the lower cetane number of butanol which results in stronger premixed combustion. The addition of butanol is beneficial to concentrating the heat release and thus shorten the combustion duration. With an increased proportion of butanol, soot emissions of butanol and biodiesel fuel blends decrease, the number concentration and volume concentration of ultrafine particles (UFPs) reduce noticeably. Meanwhile, the geometric mean diameters of UFPs decrease with an increase in butanol. With an increase of the engine loads, the number concentration peaks of UFPs gradually transfer from the size range of nucleation mode particles (NMPs) to the size range of accumulation mode particles (AMPs) due to the elevated combustion temperatures and high equivalence ratios. Moreover, biodiesel and fuel blends exhibit a higher percentage of NMPs as compared to diesel because of the fuel-bound oxygen, zero aromatics, and low sulfides.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)438-449
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the Energy Institute
Volume92
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2019

Keywords

  • Biodiesel
  • Butanol
  • Combustion characteristics
  • Soot emission
  • Ultrafine particles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Fuel Technology
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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